Archive for November, 2010

  • Socio-political networking

    Posted by on November 11, 2010

    Yesterday’s demonstrations against the rise in university tuition fees in Britain has highlighted a change in the language and mechanics of political protest. For the first time, students organised themselves via social networking sites like Facebook, and when things turned violent, police used Twitter to communicate with troublemakers. Many of the protestors themselves were filming […]

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  • Is ‘fit for purpose’ fit for purpose?

    Posted by on November 10, 2010

    As you know from last Wednesday’s post on ‘man-words’, Stan Carey is the first in a series of guest bloggers who will be contributing to our blog for two weeks at a time until Christmas. The first of their posts will be on the subject of ‘Global English’ and the second will look at the […]

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  • You’re wearing what?!

    Posted by on November 10, 2010

    New words created by melding together bits of existing words (like vlog from video blog) can be quite fun, but also quite descriptive. One that’s entered the Open Dictionary this week is pleather, meaning artificial leather. Of course, it’s formed by combining the words plastic and leather, but it seems to me somehow deliciously suitable, […]

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  • The sound of fireworks

    Posted by on November 09, 2010

    Every year on the 5th November, people in Britain commemorate the Gunpowder Plot, a failed attempt by Guy Fawkes and his gang to blow up the Houses of Parliament. We celebrate this lucky escape by burning an effigy of Fawkes on a large bonfire and setting off fireworks to imitate the explosion, had it happened. As I […]

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  • Something to say

    Posted by on November 09, 2010

    I’ve been thinking about other types of language lately, not just those from other parts of the world, but completely different systems of communication; things like semaphore, morse code and sign language. I’ve been fascinated by this sort of thing ever since my first introduction to those pictograph puzzles when I was about seven or […]

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  • Behind the camera

    Posted by on November 09, 2010

    We’ve said before how important technology is in the classroom these days, and this blog post interested me, providing a round-up of online tools for creating your own movies and comic strips. It’s a far cry from the old days of ‘read this handout and discuss with your partner’, and it clearly makes the learning […]

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  • I can’t live without them!

    Posted by on November 08, 2010

    Mexican English month brings you a guest post by Lulu Campbell. Lulu is British but has lived in Mexico for the past 10 years, where she currently works as Macmillan’s Research and Development Publisher for Latin America. ________ I used to think I was quite articulate. Although I am English, I deemed my use of […]

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  • End of the road for libraries?

    Posted by on November 08, 2010

    What’s the future, do you think, of libraries? Do you and your students still use libraries regularly, or is everything these days so technology-based that you rarely feel the need to venture into those hallowed halls of bookishness (yes, I made that last one up, but you know what I mean)? When I was little, […]

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  • Language and words in the news – 5th November, 2010

    Posted by on November 05, 2010

    This post contains a weekly selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English and language change, and language education too. Do contact us if you would like to submit a link for us to include. […]

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  • Use with caution

    Posted by on November 05, 2010

    It’s quite common these days to use foreign words or phrases to make your speech or writing sound a bit more interesting, cosmopolitan or even learned. It should be done with caution, though, as this article in the Guardian demonstrates. There are just so many opportunities for error and embarrassment; you might find you’ve completely […]

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