Author Archive

  • Political calling? Listening closely
    to politicians …

    Posted by on November 25, 2010

    This week Dawn Nell, the second in a series of guest bloggers who are contributing to this blog over a two-week period, is looking at the ways that you (users) search Macmillan Dictionary. Dawn, who has written before on this blog, is an historian and blogger, working on the history of publishing. She was born […]

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  • Tomato? Tomato? It’s all English, isn’t it?

    Posted by on November 17, 2010

    Today we (re)introduce Dawn Nell, the second in a series of guest bloggers who are contributing to this blog over a two-week period. The first of their posts is on the subject of ‘Global English’, and the second will look at the ways that you (users) search Macmillan Dictionary. Dawn, who has written for this […]

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  • The Rainbow Nation and its strange racial terminology

    Posted by on June 28, 2010

    Although the World Cup is still on for another two weeks, we are slowly saying goodbye to South African English here on the blog. This is our final guest blog, from Dawn Nell, a Capetonian and historian. You can follow Dawn on Twitter. ___________ The description of South Africa as a Rainbow Nation is both […]

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  • Vuvuzelas and ladumas

    Posted by on June 14, 2010

    Friday saw the opening of the FIFA World Cup in South Africa. A large proportion of the world’s population will be watching football over the next four weeks. Historian and Capetonian Dawn Nell discusses South African English football/sport terms featuring in the 2010 World Cup. ________ The World Cup in South Africa will forever be […]

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  • South African English is the eish

    Posted by on June 03, 2010

    This month’s first guest post about South African English is from Dawn Nell, a historian and Capetonian. You can follow her on twitter. ____________ There’s a degree of irreverence in South African attitudes to most things, but particularly towards the English. It is something that undoubtedly has its roots in South African history, as pretty […]

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