Word of the Day

bereft

bereft

Origin of the word

Bereft originates from late 16th century English as the past participle of ‘bereave’.

Examples

Bereft is an adjective that refers to a condition of deprivation whereby someone is dispossessed of the use of something. The word is often used to refer to a person pained by the loss of or parting from a loved one. To be bereft of something is to no longer have it. Consequently, bereft is also used to mean extremely unhappy and lonely.



Officials in North Korea have described President of the United States Donald Trump as being ‘bereft of reason’ following his comments in response to the military threat of North Korea. Intensifying the escalating situation regarding the potential of North Korean nuclear missiles to pose an imminent threat to the United States, Donald Trump promised threats would be responded to with ‘fire and fury’. A statement by General Kim Rak Gyom declared that: ‘Sound dialogue is not possible with such a guy bereft of reason and only absolute force can work on him.’

Definition

lacking something that you need
View the full definition in the Macmillan Dictionary.

About the author

Macmillan Dictionary

Macmillan Dictionary

Macmillan Dictionary is an award-winning, one-stop reference for English learners and speakers around the world.

Leave a Comment