From the category archives:

south african English

  • The Rainbow Nation and its strange racial terminology

    Posted by on June 28, 2010

    Although the World Cup is still on for another two weeks, we are slowly saying goodbye to South African English here on the blog. This is our final guest blog, from Dawn Nell, a Capetonian and historian. You can follow Dawn on Twitter. ___________ The description of South Africa as a Rainbow Nation is both […]

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  • I’m no fundi, but jislaaik – all those loan words!

    Posted by on June 23, 2010

    It wasn’t until I recently researched the fascinating details about the lexicon of South African English that I realized just what a fantastic example it is of the linguistic concept of borrowing. There can’t be many language varieties that have the influence of such a broad range of languages – European, Asian and African, often […]

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  • South African words in English – then and now (part 3)

    Posted by on June 22, 2010

    The month of South African English is slowly coming to an end. This is the third and final blog from Jean Branford, a world authority on the English of South Africa and author of A Dictionary of South African English. ____________ In South Africa, too many social and political changes to enumerate have taken place […]

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  • South African words in English – then and now (part 2)

    Posted by on June 16, 2010

    This is the second of three blogs from Jean Branford, a world authority on the English of South Africa and author of A Dictionary of South African English. _________ The usual range of the South African words we use now, as part of our everyday life, pales under the spotlight of the World Cup. The […]

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  • Vuvuzelas and ladumas

    Posted by on June 14, 2010

    Friday saw the opening of the FIFA World Cup in South Africa. A large proportion of the world’s population will be watching football over the next four weeks. Historian and Capetonian Dawn Nell discusses South African English football/sport terms featuring in the 2010 World Cup. ________ The World Cup in South Africa will forever be […]

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  • James Joyce. How could they turn him down?

    Posted by on June 10, 2010

    Our next guest blog in South African English month is from Professor Tony Voss. Professor Tony Voss was educated in South Africa and the USA and has taught English literature at various universities around the world. He retired his position as head of the English Department of Natal University in 1995. He continues a research […]

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  • Kellogg’s, braais and a monkey’s wedding

    Posted by on June 09, 2010

    Our next guest post about South African English comes from Sarah Clive. Sarah lived in Johannesburg until she was six, then moved over to the UK. She now lives in Wells, Somerset with her two dogs. You can find her here or on her blog. __________ Being a bit of a word geek, I subscribe […]

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  • South African words in English – then and now (part 1)

    Posted by on June 07, 2010

    It is a pleasure and a privilege to welcome Jean Branford to our blog. A distinguished lexicographer, Jean is a world authority on the English of South Africa and author of A Dictionary of South African English. This is the first of two blogs from Dr Branford. _____________ South African words have been around in […]

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  • South African English is the eish

    Posted by on June 03, 2010

    This month’s first guest post about South African English is from Dawn Nell, a historian and Capetonian. You can follow her on twitter. ____________ There’s a degree of irreverence in South African attitudes to most things, but particularly towards the English. It is something that undoubtedly has its roots in South African history, as pretty […]

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  • Howzit

    Posted by on June 01, 2010

    It’s South African English month, lekker! When I got back to South Africa in 2002 having been away for 6 years, I was struck by the change in the English spoken there. It had become more of a mix of the other predominant languages (such as Zulu and Afrikaans) and was a real indication, I […]

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