Word of the Day

cyborg

Origin of the word

The word cyborg first appeared in 1960 when the scientist Manfred Clynes used it to describe imagined beings with both artificial and biological parts. The abilities of a cyborg are enhanced by the presence of advanced technology.

Examples

Perhaps the best-known cyborg is Darth Vader, who featured in the Star Wars movies.



The closest thing to a cyborg today is an individual with a Radio-frequency identification chip (RFID) implant. The tiny devices can be injected into the human hand. Approximately the size of a grain of rice, the computer chip is encased in a glass capsule.

Once fitted with a RFID the human has, to a small degree, become a cyborg. When it has been registered, the chip can be read by compatible software systems with contactless chip readers. That allows for payments to be made, secure doors to be opened and computers unlocked. The chip itself has no power source and only becomes active when it is in close proximity to a reader.

Definition

A creature in science fiction that is part machine and part human.
View the full definition in the Macmillan Dictionary.

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Macmillan Dictionary

Macmillan Dictionary

Macmillan Dictionary is an award-winning, one-stop reference for English learners and speakers around the world.

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