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5 Comments

  • Your article has aroused my curiosity for reading “I’m Not Hanging Noodles on your Ears”.
    While reading here Howard Reingold’s explanation on how the Japanese trust non-verbal communication, we suddenly remembered two Japanese colleagues we met in England at a Teacher’s Course. They really were good observers, at times they were silent, smiled a lot and used facial expressions in a very polite way. We enjoyed meeting them. By then we simply didn’t know the word “haragei” and what it meant.
    Thank you very much for your interesting, clear article.
    Best regards,
    Maria

  • Your article has aroused my curiosity for reading “I’m Not Hanging Noodles on your Ears”.
    While reading here Howard Reingold’s explanation on how the Japanese trust non-verbal communication, we suddenly remembered two Japanese colleagues we met in England at a Teacher’s Course. They really were good observers, at times they were silent, smiled a lot and used facial expressions in a very polite way. We enjoyed meeting them. By then we simply didn’t know the word “haragei” and what it meant.
    Thank you very much for your interesting, clear article.
    Best regards,
    Maria

  • It’s why the old Samurai used to cut their bellies open performing seppuku – it’s where they believed their true spirit or ‘heart’ was.