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4 Comments

  • Cochall is a hood, and by extension any hood-like thing; I suppose the implication is that to have the cockles of your heart warmed is to be endraped in loving warmth around your heart.

  • P. W. Joyce offers variations on the cockles phrase, e.g. “take the cockles off your heart” and “raise the cockles o’ my heart”, and suggests (p.194 here) that “cares and troubles clog the heart as cockles clog a ship”.

    But this seems to be a guess. T. P. Dolan connects the phrase with the Irish cochall. Bernard Share concurs: in Slanguage, he includes the phrase “i gcochall mo chroí” (“deep down in my heart”), and quotes from a Sunday Tribune article about research carried out by Dymphna Lonergan. The last four lines are about cochall (which, as Pageturners says, means “hood”).

  • I’ve only ever heard meas used with on, e.g. “She has no meas on him since the day he burnt down the barn.” But I think it can also be used with in.