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4 Comments

  • Interestingly, the word trilemma has been pushed to the fore by a historian (Niall Ferguson). See this Guardian article. The use of this word is normally restricted to more subject-specific domains (e.g. economics, philosophy), but the current global financial crisis – as illustrated by Kerry Maxwell’s article – is very productive in extending the use of words to more general contexts.

  • My favorite journalistic ridiculosity was when a closely-contested political contest came down to a run-off election between the male incumbent and the female challenger and the fearless cub reporter chose to term the contest a “mano a womano” combat.

  • I know this is not directly concerned with the topic but as president of LAFS ,the Less and Fewer Society, I wish the BBC would get that right and not demonstrate the growing trend to losing the word “fewer” from the language.

  • Trilemma is actually not a “made up” word and is certainly not brand new. While it is not used often it has been in use since the 1840s and is even used in theoretical phrases such as Bayle’s trilemma and the Munchausen trilemma. The Lewis trilemma refers to C.S. Lewis’ Christisn apologetics proposal that Christ could only be a liar, a lunatic, or the Lord.