Language tip of the week: increase

Posted by on August 22, 2013

Learn English with Macmillan DictionaryIn this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. These tips are usually based on areas of English which learners find difficult, e.g. spelling, grammar, collocation, synonyms, etc.

This week’s language tip brings you some useful advice on other ways of saying increase:

be/go up: to increase; used for talking about prices or levels
House prices went up a further 12 percent last year.
push up: to make something increase; used for talking about prices or levels
It is feared that the new taxes will push up fuel prices.
rise: to increase
The number of complaints rose to record levels.
soar: to increase quickly and to a very high level; used mainly in journalism
Stock prices have soared to an all-time high.
rocket or skyrocket: (informal) to increase quickly and suddenly; used mainly in journalism
Bad weather means fresh fruit prices are set to skyrocket.
mount: to increase steadily
The CEO is under mounting pressure to resign.
be on the increase: to be increasing steadily
New cases of breast cancer seem to be on the increase.
double: to increase to twice the original amount or level
Oil prices have more than doubled since last year.
triple: to increase to three times the original amount or level
The last six months have seen the company’s value triple.

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Comments (2)
  • thank you all, really helpful

    Posted by chaminda on 29th August, 2013
  • The tips are very useful for a teacher of English who has the command English as a Second language. I will be thankful if I get free resources.

    Congratulatios to the team for the ideas that contribute to improve teaching-learning process. Thanks.

    Posted by Mirta Alvarez on 30th August, 2013
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