Out of the black and into the red …

Posted by on October 15, 2010

Regular users of the Macmillan Dictionary will be familiar with the red / black words feature (if you’re not familiar with it, take a look at the entry for freeze, and the one for billionaire, and you’ll notice that the colour of the word itself varies, and there’s an explanation of ‘red words’ at the top right of the entry). We use the red and black colour coding to indicate the frequency with which different words are used in everyday language. Exploring this feature can be a good way to help students learn more about a word.

So here’s an e-lesson that you can use in class to encourage students to investigate dictionary entries more fully. You’ll need up to 45 minutes to do the whole lesson, though it’s broken down into handy chunks for you, if you don’t have that much time available.

Red words e-lesson Teacher’s Notes


Red Words e-lesson Worksheet

 

Comments (4)
  • thank you very much for your work!i am always happy to get new materials for my students!

    Posted by AllaSobirova on 9th November, 2010
  • i’m needed lot of worksheet ..can macmillen site help me

    Posted by sundraganapathy on 26th September, 2011
  • I’m sorry ,but I have a question to ask. We can say “I try to persuade him to change his mind”and”i’ll make her to change her mind” but can we say “I’ ll change her mind” or “He changed my mind”I look forward to your answer. thank you.

    Posted by Jia Lu on 22nd October, 2011
  • Jia Liu: thanks for your question. Any of the following constructions are possible:
    1. I’ll try to persuade him to change his mind
    2. I’ll make her change her mind [but not: "I'll make her to change her mind']
    3. I’ll change her mind/He changed my mind
    Number 3 is much less likely than the others (and therefore less frequent ): usually you change your own mind, not someone else’s mind. So you say ‘I’ll change her mind’ you mean you feel confident that you will be able to persuade her to change her mind. So it’s not ‘incorrect’, it’s just rather unusual.

    Posted by Michael Rundell on 23rd October, 2011
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