Word of the Day

repeal

To state officially that a law no longer has legal authority and has ended

‘Repeal’ is to the fore on both sides of the Atlantic this week. The UK government is to start formulating its complicated Great Repeal Bill in preparation for Brexit. This legislation will encompass the current EU laws under which the United Kingdom currently operates, so that when the UK leaves the EU the transition to domestic UK law will be as smooth as possible. Parliament has to debate the legislation and the indications are that some MPs will make the Bill’s progress through the house a slow and difficult one.



On the other side of the pond, the US President moved to ‘repeal’ broadband privacy rules established by the Obama administration. The Democrats failed to support the proposition in Congress and privacy advocates strongly objected. This made little difference with the changes being passed despite the opposition. This is a precursor to another controversial move later this year when the Republicans hope to overturn net neutrality provisions introduced in 2015 by the previous administration.

repeal

to state officially that a law no longer has legal authority and has ended
The 1938 Act was repealed and replaced by the Inheritance Act 1975.

About the author

Macmillan Dictionary

Macmillan Dictionary

Macmillan Dictionary is an award-winning, one-stop reference for English learners and speakers around the world.

Leave a Comment