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2 Comments

  • Wonderful to hear the voice of Dr Branford..I was a student of hers and her husband Prof Branford in 1973/74/75; and those years inspired a life time of interest in linguistics. ‘Unpacking’ South Afican English gives one so much insight into the history and culture of the country and its peoples; I think more so than with most World Englishes. Words such as ‘location’ conjure up the torrid political past; ‘koek susters’, ‘mielie meel’ or ‘baoetie’ set the taste buds of every South African racing, ‘sies tog’ the empathy the people have for babies or pain suffered by others, and ‘hamba’ gets you moving. It’s illuminating that few words describing food have crept into SAE from Bantustan languages, but many from the kitchens of Malay decendants have. Ah, what a diverse language SAouth African English is, expressing the diverse culture of that country!

  • Juslaaik, Jean… narce ter ear yew ! yer words are on the page en ar ken ear yew. Reely narce.

    ther stewarts hev bin bar ther house hier. It was er lekker jol en wee cort up with news frim yr part of the

    werld. Your students were fortunate to hear the “Real Thing” in their day….. Us oldenaars need others

    to keep the whole thing rolling along before the deadening electronic media turn it “all” to platitudinous

    inanities – Long may A rich and extensive expansive “Inglis” vocab & lang. fleurit. “Chiz”. Ever D&N