Word of the Day

submarine

Origin of the word

The word submarine is composed of two morphemes, sub and marine. Sub is a prefix of Latin origin that means ‘below’ or ‘under’, while marine originates from the Latin ‘marinus’ meaning ‘belonging or related to the sea’. The first recorded use of submarine is from 1648.

Examples

Submarine is a noun that refers to a type of watercraft designed to function under water. It is a kind of naval vessel typically used for military purposes, widely used for the first time in World War I. The noun originated as a shortened form of submarine boat, and its evolution has seen it colloquially abbreviated to sub.



The inventor of a submarine has been charged following the disappearance of a journalist who was on board his vessel before it mysteriously sank. Kim Wall, a Swedish journalist composing a piece about submarines, met with Peter Madsen and embarked upon a journey on the Nautilus before she disappeared. The Nautilus, which at the time of its launch was the world’s largest privately owned submarine, sank in Køge Bay, southwest of Copenhagen. The police are working on the theory that Madsen may have deliberately sunk the submarine in order to conceal evidence.

Definition

A ship that can travel both on the surface of the water and under water.
View the full definition in the Macmillan Dictionary.

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Macmillan Dictionary

Macmillan Dictionary

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