E-Mail 'The year "elite" changed its meaning: a linguistic review of 2016' To A Friend

Email a copy of 'The year "elite" changed its meaning: a linguistic review of 2016' to a friend

* Required Field






Separate multiple entries with a comma. Maximum 5 entries.



Separate multiple entries with a comma. Maximum 5 entries.


E-Mail Image Verification

Loading ... Loading ...

6 Comments

  • Great review of the year in words, Michael! Disemvowel was a favourite of mine too, and one I first saw while browsing new entries in the Open Dictionary.
    As for a word of the year: I hesitate to call it mine, because I haven’t thought about this much, but one word that would definitely be up there (and which hasn’t been named as a WOTY elsewhere, I think) is normalization. I’ve found it very useful in describing some of what’s going on politically this year – though I wish it were otherwise, since it’s generally bad things that are being normalized.

  • Post-truth was definitely the word of the year for me. Even though a couple of people I know were interviewed by folk giving them a really hard time for it, such as ‘it’s not a word, it’s two words!’ I think my favourite though was was this one from a right-wing radio ranter interview – ‘It’s not a word, it’s an adjective!’
    I would like to nominate an as-yet non-existent WOTY for 2017. Trexit.Because I know words. I have the best words.Let’s hope Trexit comes to pass.

  • Thanks Janet, that’s a great suggestion! Of course we already have a very strong candidate for 2017: ‘alternative fact’. And who know what else this year will bring.

  • Great article. One quibble: I don’t know the context of Theresa May’s remark, but I suspect she wasn’t actually offering a definition of “Brexit.” I think she was trying to say that there was no room for ambiguity, that leaving the EU was what the majority voted for and it was really going to happen. It was used in the same sense as the slogan “No means no,” which conveys the message that there is nothing equivocal about denial of consent to have sex. In other words, “no” doesn’t mean “maybe.”