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4 Comments

  • Anger can also be cold. A few examples:

    You could tell they hated each other for their interactions were glacial.

    He spoke coldly, his agitation clear.

    She froze him out when their debate crossed the line.

    His contempt was obvious as he spoke coolly to his opponent.

    Her icy gaze pierced him; it was clear she was too angry to argue.

    Revenge is a dish best served cold.

  • Thanks Meghan – that’s an excellent point. You can also describe someone’s attitude or behaviour as frigid or frosty. In fact I’d go so far as to say that cold anger is more dangerous and more upsetting for the recipient than the hot variety.
    Returning to the hot theme, you can also say that sparks fly when people have an angry exchange.