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  • Language tip of the week: causing emotions

    Posted by on August 25, 2016

    Learn English with Macmillan DictionaryIn this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. In this series of language tips to accompany the Real Vocabulary theme we look at how you can expand your vocabulary in English by using different words and expressions instead of core vocabulary items.

    This set of language tips will explore the words and phrases we use to talk about feelings. This week’s tip looks at adjectives for describing things that make someone feel a certain emotion:

    emotional causing strong emotions such as sadness or anger:
    A funeral is always an emotional time for a family. It was so emotional for me to win this race.

    emotive an emotive issue or question is one that people have strong feelings about; emotive language is designed to arouse strong feelings:
    Abortion is an emotive issue. ♦ He uses the emotive word ‘indoctrination’.
    moving making you feel emotions such as pity, sadness, or sympathy:
    His letter was deeply moving. ♦ a moving film about the victims of war
    sentimental making you feel emotions such as pity, sadness, or sympathy, often in a very obvious way that seems false:
    Their songs are overblown, sentimental and melodramatic. ♦ His novels are so sentimental, I can’t bear them.
    touching making you feel emotional and sympathetic, for example by being sad:
    It was a touching story about a young brother and sister. ♦ The film is occasionally funny and at times oddly touching.

    Did you know that Macmillan Dictionary includes a full thesaurus? This page lists more ways to say ‘causing strong feelings‘.

    More language tips

    Browse the list under the ‘language tips‘ tag here on the blog for more useful language tips.

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Recent Comments

Recent Comments
  • Posted by ramesh krishnamurthy to Netting, texting, impacting and sheeting through the centuries - more about verbing and nouning on August 17, 2016 i find it easier... and suspect that many language learners may also find it easier... to think like Hoey, and think of words acquiring grammatical functions in context... (rather than of words having a priori membership of any word class)... only corpus concordances can tell us which wordforms are more frequently used in which contexts/phraseologies, and therefore which functions they most frequently acquire... ?

  • Posted by Macmillan Dictionary to Japanese English on August 09, 2016 Hi Mariya. We had a whole month dedicated to Russian English back in 2010. You can find the posts and related material here: http://www.macmillandictionaryblog.com/regional-english/russian-english Korean English is one we haven't got round to yet, and the same goes for SIngaporean and Hong Kong English, though we do add words from all these varieties when we can. Thanks for reading and commenting.

  • Posted by mariya to Japanese English on August 09, 2016 Korean English, please. Hong Kong and Singapore too, plus Russian English. Thank you in advance

  • Posted by Ben Harrow to Language and words in the news – 5th August, 2016 on August 09, 2016 Germanglish has a surprisingly nice ring to it. 'Now Butter by the Fishes', on the other hand, does not. Another lovely post Liz Thanks

  • Posted by Ursula Riches to Pass the serviettes: dictionaries and class on July 29, 2016 Serviette was an Americanism, so i thought. Napkin makes me think of a cloth and serviette makes me think of paper. Napkin is a really cute word and it is very nice to have a cloth instead of a crummy bit of paper. It does feel nice to eat with proper cloth napkins and it feels very civilised. Today many people use kitchen towel. some of them are thicker and better than paper napkins.