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  • Language tip of the week: making someone feel satisfied

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. In this series of language tips to accompany the Real Vocabulary theme we look at how you can expand your vocabulary in English by using different words and expressions instead of core vocabulary items. This set of language […]

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  • Open Dictionary Word of the Month: fake news

    Submissions to the Open Dictionary in January were well up on December’s total, which was the lowest since February 2016.  32% of these were published, which is a considerable increase on December’s acceptance rate of 25%. Our contributors come from all around the world, so the drop can’t be attributable entirely to the Christmas break; […]

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  • Language and words in the news – 17th February, 2017

    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link […]

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  • Language tip of the week: feeling satisfied

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. In this series of language tips to accompany the Real Vocabulary theme we look at how you can expand your vocabulary in English by using different words and expressions instead of core vocabulary items. This set of language […]

    Read the full article
  • Language and words in the news – 10th February, 2017

    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link […]

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  • Language tip of the week: making someone feel sad

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. In this series of language tips to accompany the Real Vocabulary theme we look at how you can expand your vocabulary in English by using different words and expressions instead of core vocabulary items. This set of language […]

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  • Real World English – Greetings

    Welcome to the sixth in this series of posts on Real World English by Ed Pegg. In this series of videos and blog posts we are looking at how words are used in context around the world and how differences in usage in different countries and cultural contexts can cause misunderstanding. We look at differences […]

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  • What does it mean when a word is not in the dictionary?

    Sometimes you’ll see a word you’re not sure of, so you look it up in a dictionary – and lo and behold, it’s missing. You may conclude it’s not a ‘real word’, or maybe not even a word at all. But this is premature. Most words that people look up but fail to find in […]

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  • Language and words in the news – 3rd February, 2017

    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link […]

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  • Language tip of the week: looking or sounding sad

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. In this series of language tips to accompany the Real Vocabulary theme we look at how you can expand your vocabulary in English by using different words and expressions instead of core vocabulary items. This set of language […]

    Read the full article
  • Language and words in the news – 28th January, 2017

    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link […]

    Read the full article
  • Language tip of the week: feeling sad because something has not happened

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. In this series of language tips to accompany the Real Vocabulary theme we look at how you can expand your vocabulary in English by using different words and expressions instead of core vocabulary items. This set of language […]

    Read the full article

Recent Comments

Recent Comments
  • Posted by Jessica Teo to A list of metaphors on February 21, 2017 Pls put meaning . Thks. Also extremely helpful and as others have said .... Original

  • Posted by Stan Carey to Don’t dis this prefix on February 07, 2017 Thanks for the interesting examples, Liz. There aren't very many citations in COHA either, and I don't think I've ever heard someone use the word in speech.

  • Posted by Liz to Don’t dis this prefix on February 07, 2017 Hi Stan and Catherine. This is a very rare word indeed in modern usage: the huge corpus I use has only 95 citations, including quite a bit of spam. Leaving those and archaic examples aside, we find lines for the meanings of 'set free from captivity' and 'disenchant'. Here are a few examples: By the end of the book, however, I was completely disenthralled. It's awfully easy to become disenthralled by current events. As 1862 drew to...

  • Posted by Stan Carey to Don’t dis this prefix on February 07, 2017 Thanks for the input, Catherine. It appears disenthral can have either sense; the OED defines it as: "to set free from enthralment or bondage; to liberate from thraldom", and its citations refer to being disenthralled from tyranny and passions, among other things. Thraldom, in turn, it defines as "the state or condition of being a thrall; bondage, servitude; captivity", with both literal and figurative subsenses.

  • Posted by Catherine Barber to Don’t dis this prefix on February 01, 2017 Quote: "Disenthral means release – not from captivation but from captivity; it means ‘set free, liberate’. This is because enthral originally meant ‘hold in thrall’ quite literally – to enslave or hold captive – and disenthral contains and negates that earlier sense." Correct me if I'm wrong but I'm interpreting 'disenthral' to mean release from the captivity of captivation - ie, I may become captivated by an attractive but not really very good person, and, knowing that...