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  • Language tip of the week: argument

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. In this series of  language tips we look at how metaphor is used to express some common concepts in English. This week’s tip looks at metaphors used to talk about arguments: An argument is like a fight or […]

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  • Etymology bites back

    We’ve all been offered a ‘morsel’ of something – pie, cake, or some other food perhaps – or we may have received a morsel of praise for being the person who offered it. But unless you’re etymologically inclined, you might not have stopped to wonder where the word comes from, and it’s a lot less […]

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  • Language and words in the news – 29th August, 2015

    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link […]

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  • From belfie to twitterhoea: new words from social media

    All this month, we’re celebrating the fact that the Open Dictionary has now been integrated with the main Dictionary in search results. A major source of new words these days is of course social media. And with that in mind, I’ve scoured the Open Dictionary archives to find the best contributions the worlds of Facebook […]

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  • Language tip of the week: deceive

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. In this series of  language tips we look at how metaphor is used to express some common concepts in English. This week’s tip looks at metaphors used to talk about deceiving people: Deceiving someone is like sending or […]

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  • Language and words in the news – 21st August, 2015

    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link […]

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  • Language tip of the week: relationship

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. In this series of  language tips we look at how metaphor is used to express some common concepts in English. This week’s tip looks at metaphors used to talk about relationships: Relationships between people or groups are like […]

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  • Bandying the word ‘bandy’ about

    Gill Francis’s post on updating the linguistics entries in Macmillan Dictionary described a technical term as ‘not usually bandied about in public’. This got me wondering about the curious word bandy and the different ways we use it. We might say someone is bandy-legged, for example, meaning curved outwards at the knees (bow-legged is a […]

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  • Language and words in the news – 14th August, 2015

    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link […]

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  • Language tip of the week: honest

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. In this series of  language tips we look at how metaphor is used to express some common concepts in English. This week’s tip looks at metaphors used to talk about being honest: Being honest and moral is like […]

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  • Open Dictionary Word of the Month: smoko

    Submissions to the Open Dictionary in July continued the theme of food words from around the globe. So we have added, among others, aloo tikki (‘a famous Indian snack made of potato and spices’), kreplach (small dumplings filled with meat or cheese, eaten on Jewish holidays) and lahmacun (a type of middle Eastern pizza). A […]

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  • Language and words in the news – 7th August, 2015

    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link […]

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Recent Comments

Recent Comments
  • Posted by Kerry to From belfie to twitterhoea: new words from social media on August 28, 2015 Loving this Henry, thanks :-) Btw 'twintern' and 'subtweet' got the full BuzzWord treatment here: http://www.macmillandictionary.com/buzzword/entries/twintern.html and here: http://www.macmillandictionary.com/buzzword/entries/subtweet.html

  • Posted by Maria do Céu P. Costa to Language tip of the week: nervous on August 27, 2015 Dear MACMILLAN DICTIONARY Team Thanks for the language tip of the week. Some of those above were new for me... As a very keen language learner attentive to new words and their meanings, I thoroughly welcome the outcome of your ongoing research. Best Wishes Maria do Céu

  • Posted by Lawrence to You say 'soda', I say 'pop': a Midwestern observation of language on August 21, 2015 I live in Missouri and we don't say "My car needs washed", we say "My car needs warshed."

  • Posted by Liz to Language tip of the week: honest on August 19, 2015 There's much more on this topic in a piece by Diane Nicholls for MED magazine. Definitely worth a look: http://www.macmillandictionaries.com/MED-Magazine/June2004/20-Metaphor-Honesty.htm

  • Posted by Stan Carey to Centring around a usage disagreement on August 06, 2015 That's fair enough, Tim. The phrase doesn't annoy me, but I still don't use it, and when editing I would sometimes change it to centre on if the less disputed phrase works better or equally well. But it's not the case that centre around became acceptable only in the 1990s — it was in uncontroversial use for decades before complaints started to appear about a century ago.