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  • Language tip of the week: make someone feel happy

    Posted by on December 09, 2016

    Learn English with Macmillan DictionaryIn this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. In this series of language tips to accompany the Real Vocabulary theme we look at how you can expand your vocabulary in English by using different words and expressions instead of core vocabulary items.

    This set of language tips will explore the words and phrases we use to talk about feelings. This week’s tip looks at verbs and phrases that mean to make someone feel happy:

    make someone happy to make someone feel happy:
    I’ve tried everything I can think of to make him happy. ♦ It makes me happy to see the children playing together.
    please someone to make someone feel happy and satisfied:
    He’ll do anything to please her. ♦ Some people are very hard to please.
    satisfy someone to please someone by giving them what they want or need:
    It’s impossible to satisfy everyone.

    cheer someone up to make someone feel happier when they have been feeling upset or fed up:
    I know just what will cheer you up.

    Did you know that Macmillan Dictionary includes a full thesaurus? This page lists more ways to talk about ‘making someone feel happy‘.

    More language tips

    Browse the list under the ‘language tips‘ tag here on the blog for more useful language tips.

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  • The year “elite” changed its meaning: a linguistic review of 2016

    It’s been a busy year. In 2016, the US elected a new president, while Britain voted to leave the European Union – and both events left a big linguistic trail. Brexit had already been in Macmillan Dictionary since 2013, but in June its meaning changed, from referring to the (unlikely) possibility of Britain exiting the EU, […]

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  • Don’t dis this prefix

    The prefix dis- is commonly added to words to give them an opposite or contrasting sense. It entered English from Latin dis-, or in some cases from Old French des-. On his affixes website Michael Quinion says the prefix ‘had various linked senses in Latin, such as reversal, moving apart, removal or separation’, or sometimes […]

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  • Language and words in the news – 2nd December, 2016

    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link […]

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  • Language tip of the week: happy times and situations

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. In this series of language tips to accompany the Real Vocabulary theme we look at how you can expand your vocabulary in English by using different words and expressions instead of core vocabulary items. This set of language […]

    Read the full article
  • Barbershop Shakes

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  • Seachangers, salad days and skim milk

    In her third and final post about the links between the language of Shakespeare and the language of today, BuzzWord author Kerry Maxwell shows how the Bard’s metaphors live on in modern English. _____________ In Australian English, the word seachanger has in recent years become the catchy new way to describe a person who shuns […]

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  • Language and words in the news – 26th November, 2016

    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link […]

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  • Real World English – Holiday and vacation

    Welcome to the third in this series of posts on Real World English by Ed Pegg. In this series of videos and blog posts we are looking at how words are used in context around the world and how differences in usage in different countries and cultural contexts can cause misunderstanding. We look at differences […]

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  • Language tip of the week: having a positive attitude

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. In this series of language tips to accompany the Real Vocabulary theme we look at how you can expand your vocabulary in English by using different words and expressions instead of core vocabulary items. This set of language […]

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  • Open Dictionary Word of the Month: jackrabbit

    The blog schedule has been rather crowded lately, so this post looks at Open Dictionary submissions for two months, September and October.  Submissions were slightly up in September and again in October, but the number of rejected entries was up too, with approval levels for both months falling below 30% for the first time since […]

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  • ‘Net migration’: when does a term move from policy into the press?

    Our latest guest post looks at the fascinating topic of the language used to talk about migration. Will Allen is a Research Officer with The Migration Observatory and the Centre on Migration, Policy, and Society (COMPAS), both based at the University of Oxford. His research focuses on the ways that media, public opinion, and policymaking […]

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  • Language and words in the news – 18th November, 2016

    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link […]

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Recent Comments

Recent Comments
  • Posted by Mohamed gumaa to Welcome to Real World English on December 09, 2016 I really like these

  • Posted by Katherine Barber to The year "elite" changed its meaning: a linguistic review of 2016 on December 09, 2016 What an excellent article!

  • Posted by Kerry to What language should we be teaching? on November 24, 2016 Thanks for this Andrew. Really interesting piece and reassuring for me as a fledgling materials writer too - I'm working with Macmillan on a new series of worksheets called 'Language For' on the One stop english site, Our ethos is to look at scenarios which are useful to students but perceived as a little more 'niche' in that they're not so commonly found in coursebooks, e.g. http://www.onestopenglish.com/skills/vocabulary/macmillan-dictionary-resources/language-for/language-for-online-shopping/ ...

  • Posted by Liz to US election word of the week: electoral college on November 21, 2016 So the unlikely and unexpected (by most people) happened and Donald Trump won the US presidential election. With more than 99% of votes counted, he has 290 electoral college votes to Hillary Clinton's 230. But the result is surprising in another way, because Clinton has won the popular vote by a very large margin with, at the time of writing, over 62.5 million votes to Trump's 61.2 million (third party candidates gained just under 6.5 million)....

  • Posted by Mark Boles to Language and words in the news – 18th November, 2016 on November 21, 2016 Greetings. This may be trivial but the search for this word is driving us crazy. The word means "to leave". It is similar in sound to esquagitate or exquagitate _ (but I cannot find it under any spelling I can come up with) Thanks for any consideration and sorry if this is a head-scratcher.