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  • Love English Awards 2014 – the nominees!

    Posted by on December 19, 2014

    Love English Awards 2014The nominations stage of the Love English Awards 2014 has come to an end. Hundreds of people around the world have nominated their favourite website, blog and Facebook page about the English language. It’s now time to reveal the final list of nominees!

    Remember, voting starts on 13 January 2015 on Macmillan Dictionary. Make sure your vote counts!

    A note for the nominees:

    We’ve aimed to contact as many nominees as possible, offering the option to opt out should they wish to do so. Please get in touch before 5 January 2015 if you’d like to be removed from the list. All nominees can also download their nominated badge from today (see below).

    Nominees for Best Blog about the English language (in alphabetical order):

    • A language studio
    • Atelier storytime
    • Bites and Bits of English
    • Burcu Akyol’s Blog
    • CELE Blog
    • Classroom number 4
    • Confessions of the Linguistic Spy
    • Daily Lessons with Simon, ex-IELTS examiner
    • EF Blog
    • El blog de Amanda
    • ELT stories
    • ELT-CATION
    • Engames
    • English is FUNtastic
    • English with a Twist
    • Kaplan International Blog
    • Larissa’s Languages
    • Lost in Translations
    • Luke’s English Podcast
    • Movie Segments for Warm-Ups and Follow-Ups
    • Multilinguablog
    • My English Blog
    • My English Teacher Blog
    • OUP ELT Global Blog
    • Prospero blog: Johnson column
    • Sentence First
    • Songs to Teach English
    • Speech Talk
    • Teach them English
    • Teacher Marija ESL
    • Teachersarasblog
    • The Travelling Teachers
    • The YUNiversity
    • Woodward English
    • Your English Fairy

    Nominees for Best Facebook page about the English language (in alphabetical order):

    • 5Perc Angol – 5Minute English
    • Atelier storytime
    • BBC Learning English
    • CELTA Athens
    • Cork English Teacher
    • Delta Publishing
    • English Experts
    • English Idioms
    • English is Fun
    • English Laughs Best
    • English with a Twist
    • Extra English TV Programme
    • Grammarly
    • Green Forest School
    • Help for English
    • How to Spell
    • Learn English British Council
    • Lexical lab
    • L’inglese e lo spagnolo a Cremona
    • Luke’s ENGLISH Podcast
    • Mastering Grammar
    • OUP ELT
    • Real Life English
    • Speak English with Amy
    • Teach them English
    • Teachersarablog
    • Teaching English British Council
    • Time for English!
    • Timothy Doner: Polyglotpal
    • Vocab meme
    • Woodward English

    Nominees for Best Website about the English language (in alphabetical order):

    • 5Perc Angol – 5Minute English
    • ABA English
    • ADELT – Adviser English Language Teaching
    • Anglais Facile
    • BBC Learning English
    • British Council LearnEnglish
    • Busuu
    • Busy Teacher
    • Cambridge Dictionary Online
    • Core and Quirks
    • DailyStep English
    • DC IELTS
    • Dictionary.com
    • Dreams Come True
    • Edutopia
    • English Experts
    • English Wizardry
    • English, baby!
    • EngVid
    • ENpodcast.com
    • ESL Mania
    • ESL Printables
    • ETAS Switzerland
    • Film English
    • Grammarist
    • Help for English
    • How to Spell
    • Howjsay
    • IXL Language Arts
    • Learn English Teens
    • Learn English with a WorldWide Perspective
    • L’inglese e lo spagnolo a Cremona
    • Listening Express
    • Newsmart
    • OneLook Dictionary Search
    • OUP ELT
    • Perfect English Grammar
    • Simple English Videos
    • Teaching English Community (TEC²)
    • Using English
    • Vocabulary.com
    • Woodward English Grammar
    • WordReference.com
    • World Wide Words

    Nominees can download the badges below for their blog/website/Facebook page.

    vote for us_love english2

    vote for us_love english2

    vote for us_love english2

     

     

     

    LEA Best Blog  2014 - Nominated  LEA Best Facebook Page 2014 - NominatedLEA Best Website 2014 - Nominated

     

     

     

     

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  • Language tip of the week: love

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. In this new series of  language tips we will be looking at how metaphor is used to express some common concepts in English. This week’s tip looks at metaphors used to talk about love: When you love someone […]

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  • New pragmatics lesson plan: ways of praising someone

    Have you seen our latest lesson plan by author Jonathan Marks? It’s the final one in the ‘expressing yourself’ series and helps learners review and consolidate ways of praising someone. What’s included? Worksheets for students, tips for teachers, as well as an answer key and suggested follow-up activities. All pragmatics lesson plans – including this […]

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  • They don’t shoot dead people, do they?

    Each Saturday a small section entitled ‘Chris Maslanka’s Puzzles’ appears on the Guardian newspaper’s puzzle page. One puzzle features a ‘Professor Pedanticus’, who – you guessed it – is a pedant, the sort of old-school fuddy-duddy who wants the English language to stay exactly as it was at some idealised point in his past – […]

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  • Word roots and routes: close

    Next in a series of posts exploring some of the ‘roots’ and ‘routes’ of English vocabulary. A popular stereotype concerning English vocabulary is that the high-frequency, monosyllabic words are of Germanic origin. This is often the case, but by no means always, and one of the exceptions is close, which has a Latin origin. Close is a particularly busy […]

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  • Language and words in the news – 12th December, 2014

    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link […]

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  • Language tip of the week: lawyer

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. These tips are usually based on areas of English which learners find difficult, e.g. spelling, grammar, collocation, synonyms, usage, etc. This week’s language tip helps with the differences in usage in American and British English of the word […]

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  • Real Grammar Quiz, Question 4: Is it OK to split an infinitive?

    Real Grammar isn’t about the made-up or outdated “rules” which some people try to make us follow. As we said in the introduction to this new series from Macmillan Dictionary, Real Grammar is based on the evidence of language in use. In the coming months, we’ll be bringing you blog posts and videos that give evidence-based answers to frequently asked questions about grammar and […]

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  • Flat adverbs are exceeding fine

    We can do something quick or do it quickly, go slow or go slowly. But though we can do something fast, we don’t do it fastly – this is not a word you’re likely to hear from a native English speaker. How come? Fast, slow, and quick all belong to the set of adverbs in […]

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  • Language and words in the news – 5th December, 2014

    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link […]

    Read the full article
  • Language tip of the week: understand

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. In this new series of  language tips we will be looking at how metaphor is used to express some common concepts in English. This week’s tip looks at metaphors used to talk about understanding something: Understanding something is […]

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  • Life skills tip of the week: ways of praising someone

    Learning about pragmatics and how to express yourself successfully is a useful life skill, said Michael Rundell in January when he introduced the new pragmatics series on Macmillan Dictionary. The series is part of the Macmillan Life Skills campaign, offering free resources for English language students and teachers each month. As part of the series, we’ll bring more useful content and […]

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  • The ups and downs of conversation

    In the previous post in this series, I presented some examples of how people often establish a topic before going on to say what they want to say about it – eg: That painting at the top of the stairs, I got that from my grandmother – or reiterate or clarify the topic at the […]

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Recent Comments

Recent Comments
  • Posted by Michael Rundell to They don’t shoot dead people, do they? on December 19, 2014 Good point about ambiguity, Gill (and the complete absence of it in the examples you quote). Prescriptivists are fond of arguing that if older distinctions aren't maintained, utterances become ambiguous. But as you say, context almost always resolves any potential ambiguity. I've heard people argue that using "disinterested" to mean "uninterested" is hazardous because how will the listener know which meaning the speaker intends? But this is a fatuous argument, since most (common) words have more...

  • Posted by Elizabeth Manning to They don’t shoot dead people, do they? on December 19, 2014 I agree that Pedanticus is overreacting and it is not always bad English to put the adjective before the noun group in sentences like this; and that when the noun group is a long one, it is actually better to put the adjective first. But it started me wondering why, with short noun groups, the adj-before-noun-group pattern sounds perfectly OK with some verbs but not with others. For example, "A neighbour forced open the front door",...

  • Posted by Aven to Language and words in the news – 12th December, 2014 on December 17, 2014 Hi! Thought you might consider including this video on the origins of the word "Yule" in this week's round-up. Thanks, and happy Yule! (Also, io Saturnalia!). http://youtu.be/thKqObFOw08

  • Posted by Luqi Wan to Language tip of the week: money on December 14, 2014 Language Tips of the week is very helpful to us in teaching English in China. Otherwise, We may confuse the exact meanings of words that we are talking about here.

  • Posted by Liz to Language tip of the week: intelligence on December 11, 2014 Hi Mac. 'Intelligence is like a light' is indeed a simile. The format of these articles, and the Macmillan Dictionary features they are based on, is to identify a set of metaphors that apply to a particular quality or feeling, such as intelligence or happiness, and then to explore those metaphors. So 'intelligence is like a light', or 'feeling happy is like being high up' tell you what the metaphor is; as you point out they...