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  • Language tip of the week: feeling sad about life

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. In this series of language tips to accompany the Real Vocabulary theme we look at how you can expand your vocabulary in English by using different words and expressions instead of core vocabulary items. This set of language […]

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  • Real World English – School

    Welcome to the fifth in this series of posts on Real World English by Ed Pegg. In this series of videos and blog posts we are looking at how words are used in context around the world and how differences in usage in different countries and cultural contexts can cause misunderstanding. We look at differences […]

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  • Language and words in the news – 13th January, 2017

    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link […]

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  • Language tip of the week: feeling sad

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. In this series of language tips to accompany the Real Vocabulary theme we look at how you can expand your vocabulary in English by using different words and expressions instead of core vocabulary items. This set of language […]

    Read the full article
  • Pearl clutchers, snowflakes, elites and SJWs

    In his linguistic review of 2016 last month, editor-in-chief Michael Rundell discussed the rise in people’s use of the word elite and showed how it ‘now seems to mean whatever anyone wants it to mean’. Lane Greene at the Economist reached a similar conclusion, writing that elite is ‘becoming a junk-bin concept used by different […]

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  • Happy New Year from Macmillan Dictionary

    It’s been another busy year at Macmillan Dictionary. There were two new releases of Macmillan English Dictionary, the first featuring South African English, the second concentrating on Philippine English and legal English. Kerry Maxwell has kept her finger on the linguistic pulse with Buzzwords ranging from stuffocation to webrooming. The Open Dictionary has continued to […]

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  • Merry Christmas from the Macmillan Dictionary team

    One of the quintessential elements of a British Christmas is the singing of carols, an activity that has retained its popularity despite the general decline in religious observance. From the Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols broadcast around the world from King’s College Cambridge to groups gathered in shopping centres, town squares and on village […]

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  • Language and words in the news – 23rd December, 2016

    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link […]

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  • Open Dictionary Word of the Year: hopemonger

    It’s time to look back at the fortunes of the Open Dictionary during 2016. So far this year, over 1400 entries from all around the world have been published in the Open Dictionary, and just under 3000 rejected. Obviously a post like this can only give a taste of such riches, but here are some […]

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  • Language tip of the week: making someone feel happy

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. In this series of language tips to accompany the Real Vocabulary theme we look at how you can expand your vocabulary in English by using different words and expressions instead of core vocabulary items. This set of language […]

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  • Language and words in the news – 16th December, 2016

    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link […]

    Read the full article
  • Language tip of the week: to become happy again

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. In this series of language tips to accompany the Real Vocabulary theme we look at how you can expand your vocabulary in English by using different words and expressions instead of core vocabulary items. This set of language […]

    Read the full article

Recent Comments

Recent Comments
  • Posted by Jose Oliveira to Welcome to Real World English on January 18, 2017 I have watched all your Realworldenglish videos and found them quite useful. Thanks for your excellent work. Keep posting new videos in 2017. Jose

  • Posted by Liz to Child’s ply on January 15, 2017 I think the point is that the writer misheard the word 'mate' in its unfamiliar Australian pronunciation and supplied the most familiar likely alternative, which was 'Mike'.

  • Posted by Stan Carey to Pearl clutchers, snowflakes, elites and SJWs on January 11, 2017 There's also the related phrase do-good, used as both a noun and an adjective. It emerged in earnest in the 19–20thC, according to the OED, but there is a trailblazing example from back in 1654: "That they may be accounted somebody, and Do-goods." (Richard Whitlock, Ζωοτομ́iα; or, Observations on the present manners of the English).

  • Posted by Hillary to Child’s ply on January 11, 2017 mike is pronounce for mate right?

  • Posted by Adrian Morgan to Pearl clutchers, snowflakes, elites and SJWs on January 11, 2017 Traditionally, a "do-gooder" is someone who superficially does "good", but only out of a desire for public admiration. As with any insult, the description may or may not be merited. I once read a terrible book by a conservative religious practitioner which portrayed the term 'do-gooder" as a tool of the Devil, a way to criticise people for doing good. All I could think of were the emphatic criticisms of do-gooders in the Bible (notably Matthew 6:2). I...