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  • Language tip of the week: mean

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. These tips are usually based on areas of English which learners find difficult, e.g. spelling, grammar, collocation, synonyms, usage, etc. This week’s language tip helps with the differences in how people use the adjective mean in American and […]

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  • Spring is in the air!

    Spring is in the air, Easter is around the corner and over on social media we’re talking about… the best Easter webquest under the sun!  Created by Luke Vyner for onestopenglish, students are able to consolidate their Easter vocabulary and learn more about the festival’s symbols and celebrations. In addition to the quest, the infographic […]

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  • Real Grammar Quiz, Question 7: should I say “different from” or different to”?

    Real Grammar isn’t about the made-up or outdated “rules” which some people try to make us follow. As we said in the introduction to this new series from Macmillan Dictionary, Real Grammar is based on the evidence of language in use. In the coming months, we’ll be bringing you blog posts and videos that give evidence-based answers to frequently asked questions about grammar and […]

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  • Language and words in the news – 20th March, 2015

    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link […]

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  • Language tip of the week: money

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. In this series of  language tips we look at how metaphor is used to express some common concepts in English. This week’s tip looks at metaphors used to talk about money: Money is like food, which gets eaten […]

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  • Is ‘invite’ acceptable as a noun?

    Last week a friend told me to expect ‘an invite’ to something. This was unremarkable in the context, but I know people who would insist on saying invitation even when it might sound inappropriately formal. Invite is a word whose use as a noun seems destined to always raise hackles. For some people it depends […]

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  • Language and words in the news – 13th March, 2015

    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link […]

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  • Language tip of the week: programme

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. These tips are usually based on areas of English which learners find difficult, e.g. spelling, grammar, collocation, synonyms, usage, etc. This week’s language tip helps with the differences in how people use the words programme and program in […]

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  • Language and words in the news – 7th March, 2015

    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link […]

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  • Language tip of the week: friendly

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. In this series of  language tips we look at how metaphor is used to express some common concepts in English. This week’s tip looks at metaphors used to talk about being friendly: A friendly relationship between people is […]

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  • Gwyneth Fox remembered

    Sad news for all of us who have worked on the Macmillan Dictionary: our former colleague Gwyneth Fox has died after a short illness. Gwyneth’s sudden death came as a tremendous shock to everyone who knew her. She had been retired for only five years and seemed to be full of energy and in excellent […]

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  • On behalf of this fossilised phrase

    We often refer to something being done on behalf of someone, but the word behalf appears only in this set phrase and variations on it. In other words it’s not linguistically productive, so it can be described as a fossil. But what is a behalf, and where does it come from? On someone’s behalf, etymologically […]

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Recent Comments

Recent Comments
  • Posted by Macmillan Dictionary to Business letter format on March 27, 2015 I think the 2nd is better than the first, because it's clearer, but how about: Mr Lolly and I would like to thank you for...

  • Posted by devon to Business letter format on March 27, 2015 Is this correct On behalf of Mr. Lolly and me, we would like to thank you for or On behalf of Mr. Lolly, please accept our thanks for

  • Posted by Jenny Morley to Gwyneth Fox remembered on March 26, 2015 Although I have known Gwyneth for over fifteen years since her elder daughter, Karen and my elder son, Ben married I only go to know her well last year. In an act of typical generosity she had me to stay whilst I was in recovery from a shoulder operation, a month after I had also been widowed.She was wonderful company and, in spite of my sling ,our feet did not touch the ground! Later in 2014...

  • Posted by Stan to Starved with the cold on March 22, 2015 Thanks for letting me know, Elizabeth. It seems to have been preserved in several regional dialects.

  • Posted by Elizabeth Steel to Starved with the cold on March 20, 2015 Growing up south of Manchester, I remember the phrase 'I'm starved to death' always meant very cold, not hungry. Also 'it's starvation in here' referred to the temperature of the room.