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  • Language tip of the week: subway

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. These tips are usually based on areas of English which learners find difficult, e.g. spelling, grammar, collocation, synonyms, usage, etc. This week’s language tip helps with the differences in meaning of subway in American and British English. In […]

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  • Earthy Idioms

    New in our series of Language in Pictures is an infographic to celebrate Earth Day. Every year on 22nd April, people from all over the world help raise awareness about the natural world and the importance of conservation. If you’re thinking of using this topic in class, have a look at our latest infographic which […]

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  • Real Grammar Quiz, Question 8: can “like” be used as a conjunction?

    Real Grammar isn’t about the made-up or outdated “rules” which some people try to make us follow. As we said in the introduction to this new series from Macmillan Dictionary, Real Grammar is based on the evidence of language in use. In this series, we’ll be bringing you blog posts and videos that give evidence-based answers to frequently asked questions about grammar and usage. […]

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  • Language and words in the news – 17th April, 2015

    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link […]

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  • Language tip of the week: tolerance

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. In this series of  language tips we look at how metaphor is used to express some common concepts in English. This week’s tip looks at metaphors used to talk about tolerance and intolerance: Having an attitude of tolerance […]

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  • Ain’t nothin’ (grammatically) wrong with no double negatives

    When Mick Jagger sings that he ‘can’t get no satisfaction’, there’s no confusion over what he means – we know he’s not saying he can get some satisfaction. In a different context, ‘can’t get any satisfaction’ might be better, but we give singers poetic licence when it comes to grammar. We should, anyway. But we […]

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  • Language and words in the news – 10th April, 2015

    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link […]

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  • Language tip of the week: holiday

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. These tips are usually based on areas of English which learners find difficult, e.g. spelling, grammar, collocation, synonyms, usage, etc. This week’s language tip helps with the differences in how people talk about holidays in American and British […]

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  • Henry’s social media musings

    Hi! I’m Henry and I look after Macmillan Dictionary’s social media channels. (Yes, that’s me ‘liking’ and replying to those comments…) Seeing as I spend so much time online, I thought it would be a good idea to start a monthly blog on the latest buzzwords – and other linguistic trends – that I spot […]

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  • Language and words in the news – 3rd April, 2015

    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link […]

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  • Language tip of the week: busy

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. In this series of  language tips we look at how metaphor is used to express some common concepts in English. This week’s tip looks at metaphors used to talk about being busy: Being very busy at work is […]

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  • Grammar at cross purposes

    A recurring theme in Macmillan Dictionary’s Real Grammar series is the difference between actual rules in English grammar and misconceptions or ill-founded assumptions about what constitutes such a rule. Some of the issues addressed, like split infinitives and singular they, are familiar from decades or even centuries of usage debate; others, like bored of, are […]

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Recent Comments

Recent Comments
  • Posted by Macmillan Dictionary to Business letter format on April 22, 2015 Hi Janel. My preference would be for the first as it seems completely clear and sufficient. But as I said above I'm not an expert, so others may think differently.

  • Posted by Janel to Business letter format on April 21, 2015 How would we indicate that the cc recipient is not going to receive the attachments of the letter. Would the following be correct to indicate: cc: John Doe (w/o attachments) or cc. John Doe (memo & position log only)

  • Posted by Stan Carey to Hail-phrase-well-met on April 18, 2015 John: I like that one! It's the kind of joke I'd have loved as a child, too, but I never heard it till now.

  • Posted by John Cowan to Hail-phrase-well-met on April 17, 2015 One of the first jokes I ever learned as a child (my skills have improved since, really!) is "What's worse than raining cats and dogs? Hailing taxis."

  • Posted by John Cowan to ‘Genius’ and ‘rubbish’ and other noun-like adjectives on April 17, 2015 Another example of a denominal adjective that is very striking to me as an American (who doesn't have it) is s**t, as in "You've written a s**t paper here". I would have to say "s**tty paper", whereas to my BrE-speaking colleague that is too literal to be usable.