Archive for April, 2013

  • ‘Stakeholder’ stakes a claim

    Posted by on April 29, 2013

    If you had asked me as a teenager what a stakeholder was, I might have guessed “assistant vampire killer”. Why else would you hold a stake, after all? But of course the word is less literal than that – the stake in stakeholder is the degree to which someone is involved in something, financially or […]

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  • Language and words in the news – 26th April, 2013

    Posted by on April 26, 2013

    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit […]

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  • Language tip of the week: stop

    Posted by on April 25, 2013

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. These tips are based on areas of English which learners find difficult, e.g. spelling, grammar, collocation, synonyms, etc. This week’s language tip gives advice on the verb stop: When you want to say that someone is no longer […]

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  • Stories behind Words: dandelion

    Posted by on April 24, 2013

    While not having one specific influence on the way I think or work, the word (and plant) dandelion is one that has accompanied me all my life. When I was small, my grandmother taught me and my sister how to tell the time by blowing the seeds of a dandelion clock. Although the method was […]

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  • It’s all in the genes: DNA and metaphor

    Posted by on April 23, 2013

    Sixty years ago this week, the journal Nature published Francis Crick and James Watson’s groundbreaking paper on deoxyribonucleic acid, which described for the first time the double helix shape of the DNA molecule. As often happens with scientific and technical vocabulary, the term DNA soon broke out of the specialized field in which it originated, […]

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  • Verbs in learner’s dictionaries 3: ‘Your order has shipped’

    Posted by on April 22, 2013

    My recent posts (here and here) discussed verbs like teach and disappoint, which are both transitive and intransitive: she teaches (English); the festival didn’t disappoint (anyone). The grammatical subject, and the meaning of the verb, are much the same whether there’s an object or not. Today I will focus on another, quite different, way in […]

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  • Language and words in the news – 19th April, 2013

    Posted by on April 19, 2013

    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit […]

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  • Language tip of the week: change

    Posted by on April 18, 2013

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. These tips are based on areas of English which learners find difficult, e.g. spelling, grammar, collocation, synonyms, etc. This week’s language tip includes common synonyms for the verb change: alter: a more formal word for ‘change’ His election […]

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  • Stories behind Words: stroke

    Posted by on April 17, 2013

    There is one word in the English language that I will never forget. It’s a word that I had heard of, but I didn’t really know what it meant until it affected me personally. Back in 2008, someone who is very dear to me had a stroke. A stroke is a brain attack. It happens […]

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  • Competition: “Say the Word” and win £30 in eBook vouchers

    Posted by on April 16, 2013

    Last week, Michael Rundell talked in his blog post about how the music of The Beatles had an impact on the English language. The famous band from Liverpool mainly used common English words in their songs (words like you, I, me, sun, and love). Michael also writes that over 91% of the words on the […]

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