Archive for December, 2014

  • Language and words in the news – 25th December, 2014

    Posted by on December 25, 2014

    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link […]

    Read the full article
  • Are you feeling Christmassy?

    Posted by on December 24, 2014

    In countries where Christmas is celebrated, the population probably divides fairly neatly into those who love Christmas and revel in every aspect of the festive season, and those who actively dislike it. I suspect there aren’t many who can take it or leave it. The patron saint of those who shun Christmas and everything to […]

    Read the full article
  • Life skills tip of the week: ways of asking and giving permission

    Posted by on December 23, 2014

    As part of this year’s pragmatics series, we bring more useful content and tips from the Macmillan Dictionary on expressing yourself. The previous language tip looked at some of the ways of expressing approval and disapproval. This week’s tip, which is the last in the series, looks at ways of asking and giving permission. Can I…? […]

    Read the full article
  • Anti-multiple-hyphen tendencies

    Posted by on December 22, 2014

    A leading story in Irish current affairs this year has been the government’s controversial creation of Irish Water, which will charge people for their use of water, and the ensuing nationwide protests. The outcry is about much more than the water charges – there is deep, widespread anger about how the country is being run […]

    Read the full article
  • Language and words in the news – 20th December, 2014

    Posted by on December 20, 2014

    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link […]

    Read the full article
  • Love English Awards 2014 – the nominees!

    Posted by on December 19, 2014

    The nominations stage of the Love English Awards 2014 has come to an end. Hundreds of people around the world have nominated their favourite website, blog and Facebook page about the English language. It’s now time to reveal the final list of nominees! Remember, voting starts on 13 January 2015 on Macmillan Dictionary. Make sure […]

    Read the full article
  • Language tip of the week: love

    Posted by on December 18, 2014

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. In this new series of  language tips we will be looking at how metaphor is used to express some common concepts in English. This week’s tip looks at metaphors used to talk about love: When you love someone […]

    Read the full article
  • New pragmatics lesson plan: ways of praising someone

    Posted by on December 18, 2014

    Have you seen our latest lesson plan by author Jonathan Marks? It’s the final one in the ‘expressing yourself’ series and helps learners review and consolidate ways of praising someone. What’s included? Worksheets for students, tips for teachers, as well as an answer key and suggested follow-up activities. All pragmatics lesson plans – including this […]

    Read the full article
  • They don’t shoot dead people, do they?

    Posted by on December 16, 2014

    Each Saturday a small section entitled ‘Chris Maslanka’s Puzzles’ appears on the Guardian newspaper’s puzzle page. One puzzle features a ‘Professor Pedanticus’, who – you guessed it – is a pedant, the sort of old-school fuddy-duddy who wants the English language to stay exactly as it was at some idealised point in his past – […]

    Read the full article
  • Word roots and routes: close

    Posted by on December 15, 2014

    Next in a series of posts exploring some of the ‘roots’ and ‘routes’ of English vocabulary. A popular stereotype concerning English vocabulary is that the high-frequency, monosyllabic words are of Germanic origin. This is often the case, but by no means always, and one of the exceptions is close, which has a Latin origin. Close is a particularly busy […]

    Read the full article