From the category archives:

global English

  • US election word of the week: the GOP

    Posted by on May 17, 2016

    In this series we are looking at some of the language and terminology associated with the US electoral process in the run-up to the Presidential election in late 2016. This week’s word is the GOP. The GOP, pronounced by saying the individual letters, is a familiar name for the US Republican Party. Here’s what Wikipedia […]

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  • US election word of the week: front-runner

    Posted by on May 10, 2016

    In this series we are looking at some of the language and terminology associated with the US electoral process in the run-up to the Presidential election in late 2016. This week’s word is front-runner. Until last week, the front-runners in the contest for the US Presidential nominations were Donald Trump for the Republicans and Hillary […]

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  • US election word of the week: town hall meeting

    Posted by on May 03, 2016

    In this series we are looking at some of the language and terminology associated with the US electoral process in the run-up to the Presidential election in late 2016. This week’s word is town hall meeting. President Obama, in London for a brief visit a couple of weeks ago, found time in a packed schedule […]

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  • US election word of the week: Acela primary

    Posted by on April 27, 2016

    In this series we are looking at some of the language and terminology associated with the US electoral process in the run-up to the Presidential election in late 2016. This week’s word, hot off the press, is Acela primary. If you are anything like me, this week’s election word will mean nothing to you. Despite […]

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  • Open Dictionary Word of the Month: marmalade dropper

    Posted by on April 26, 2016

    207 new entries entered the Open Dictionary in March. This higher-than-usual total is due to the addition of over 100 BuzzWords culled from Kerry Maxwell‘s column of the same name. As its name suggests, the BuzzWord column focuses on the very latest linguistic novelties, and since the items added came from columns published in the […]

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  • US election word of the week: winner takes all

    Posted by on April 19, 2016

    In this series we are looking at some of the language and terminology associated with the US electoral process in the run-up to the Presidential election in late 2016. This week’s word is actually a phrase: winner take(s) all. In a proportional primary or caucus, the delegates are allocated in proportion to the percentage of […]

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  • US election word of the week: unbound delegate

    Posted by on April 12, 2016

    In this series we are looking at some of the language and terminology associated with the US electoral process in the run-up to the Presidential election in late 2016. This week’s word is unbound delegate. In the previous post we looked at the term superdelegate, which is used to refer to the Democratic Party delegates […]

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  • US election word of the week: superdelegate

    Posted by on April 06, 2016

    In this series we are looking at some of the language and terminology associated with the US electoral process in the run-up to the Presidential election in late 2016. This week’s word is superdelegate. Both the Democratic and Republican parties send a mixture of pledged and unpledged delegates to their conventions, but only the Democrats […]

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  • US election word of the week: delegate

    Posted by on March 28, 2016

    In this series we are looking at some of the language and terminology associated with the US electoral process in the run-up to the Presidential election in late 2016. This week’s word is delegate. According to Macmillan Dictionary, a delegate is simply “someone who is chosen to represent a group of other people at a […]

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  • Open Dictionary Word of the Month: Brexiter

    Posted by on March 23, 2016

    February saw 136 new entries accepted into the Open Dictionary. Remarkably this is almost exactly the same number as in January. Just over double that number were rejected, meaning that the proportion of entries accepted also remained remarkably constant. One of the great things about the Open Dictionary is that it allows us to track […]

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