language and words in the news Love English

Language and words in the news – 6th September, 2014

© Ioannis Kounadeas / Fotolia.comThis post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular.

Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link for us to include, or just add a comment to the post, with the link(s) you’d like to share.



Language change and slang

To aitch or not to aitch: the case of herb
The word in English from the Middle Ages was generally spelled (or spelt, if you prefer) erbe, from the Old French erbe–but sometimes it was spelled with an h, after the Latin herba.

From a language point of view, what’s happening in Iraq, Syria, and environs has revived words that have not been common for many years. – See more at: http://www.cjr.org/language_corner/language_corner_063014.php?utm_content=buffer811d0&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer#sthash.WQopCEDs.dpufFrom a language point of view, what’s happening in Iraq, Syria, and environs has revived words that have not been common for many years.From a language point of view, what’s happening in Iraq, Syria, and environs has revived words that have not been common for many years..

Global English

An aitch or a haitch? Let’s ’ear it.
The oddly named letter H is usually pronounced “aitch” in British English, but in Ireland we tend to aspirate it as “haitch”.

Language teaching and resources

Barcelona
This EFL lesson plan by Kieran Donaghy is designed around a stunning time-lapse short film about Barcelona by Rob Whitworth and the theme of sightseeing. Enjoy.

Books, science, dictionaries, words and language

How Cortana got its name
A lower-case cortana—sometimes spelled curtana—is a type of sword with a blunted or broken end, also known as a “sword of mercy.”

Comic Sans comes of age on the front page of The Sydney Morning Herald
And causes a bit of a kerfuffle in the process.

Gwynne’s Grammar: an unbelievably positive review
I haven’t actually read most of the book, as its first chapter is all I need to judge its extraordinary quality.

Fun

44 Medieval Beasts That Cannot Even Handle It Right Now
This basilisk just can’t with these snakes. Made me chuckle, snigger and even LOL. Warning: contains swear words.

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