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Language tip of the week: asking for something

Learn English with Macmillan DictionaryIn this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. In this series of language tips to accompany the Real Vocabulary theme we look at how you can expand your vocabulary in English by using different words and expressions instead of core vocabulary items.

This week’s tip looks at more words and phrases you can use instead of ask.



ask that someone do something a formal way of saying that you want someone to do something:
The committee has asked that this scheme be stopped for now. ♦ We ask that you treat this matter as strictly confidential.
plead to ask for something in an urgent or emotional way:
‘Please help us,’ Claire pleaded. ♦ I pleaded with you to stay but you turned your back on me.
beg or implore someone (to do something) to ask someone to do something in a way that shows you want it very much:
I’m begging you, please help me. ♦ ‘Don’t go,’ she implored. ♦ They implored us to help them. ♦ He begged her not to leave.
call for something to say publicly that something must happen:
Several of the newspapers were calling for his resignation.
appeal for something to ask people publicly to do something, especially in a difficult situation:
Both sides have appealed for calm. ♦ The police have appealed for the mother to come forward.
call on or call upon someone to do something to offically ask a person or organization to do something in order to end a bad situation:
We call upon the government to end this discrimination now. ♦ He called on the kidnappers to release all the hostages.

Did you know that Macmillan Dictionary includes a full thesaurus? This page lists more synonyms for the verb ‘ask‘.

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Liz Potter

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