Language tip of the week: marry

Posted by on January 18, 2012

In this weekly microblog, we bring to English language learners more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary. These tips are based on areas of English (e.g. spelling, grammar, collocation, synonyms, etc) which learners often find difficult.

This week’s language tip helps with the verb marry.

Don’t use the preposition with after get married or be married. Use to:
✗ A girl shouldn’t be forced to get married with a man she doesn’t like.
✓ A girl shouldn’t be forced to get married to a man she doesn’t like.
Getting married with somebody you have just met can be dangerous.
Getting married to somebody you have just met can be dangerous.
The verb to marry takes a direct object. It means the same as get married to, but is more formal:
Charles Darwin married his cousin and such marriages were quite common at that time.
Don’t say marry with someone:
✗ Most people marry with a person they love.
✓ Most people marry a person they love.

More language tips

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