Posts Tagged ‘American English’

  • US election word of the week: Acela primary

    Posted by on April 27, 2016

    In this series we are looking at some of the language and terminology associated with the US electoral process in the run-up to the Presidential election in late 2016. This week’s word, hot off the press, is Acela primary. If you are anything like me, this week’s election word will mean nothing to you. Despite […]

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  • US election word of the week: winner takes all

    Posted by on April 19, 2016

    In this series we are looking at some of the language and terminology associated with the US electoral process in the run-up to the Presidential election in late 2016. This week’s word is actually a phrase: winner take(s) all. In a proportional primary or caucus, the delegates are allocated in proportion to the percentage of […]

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  • US election word of the week: unbound delegate

    Posted by on April 12, 2016

    In this series we are looking at some of the language and terminology associated with the US electoral process in the run-up to the Presidential election in late 2016. This week’s word is unbound delegate. In the previous post we looked at the term superdelegate, which is used to refer to the Democratic Party delegates […]

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  • US election word of the week: superdelegate

    Posted by on April 06, 2016

    In this series we are looking at some of the language and terminology associated with the US electoral process in the run-up to the Presidential election in late 2016. This week’s word is superdelegate. Both the Democratic and Republican parties send a mixture of pledged and unpledged delegates to their conventions, but only the Democrats […]

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  • US election word of the week: delegate

    Posted by on March 28, 2016

    In this series we are looking at some of the language and terminology associated with the US electoral process in the run-up to the Presidential election in late 2016. This week’s word is delegate. According to Macmillan Dictionary, a delegate is simply “someone who is chosen to represent a group of other people at a […]

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  • US election word of the week: bellwether

    Posted by on March 09, 2016

    In this series we are looking at some of the language and terminology associated with the US electoral process in the run-up to the Presidential election in late 2016. This week’s word is bellwether. Generally speaking a bellwether is “something that is considered to be a sign of what is likely to happen“,  as Macmillan […]

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  • US election word of the week: Super Tuesday

    Posted by on February 29, 2016

    In this series we are looking at some of the language and terminology associated with the US electoral process in the run-up to the Presidential election in late 2016. This week’s word is Super Tuesday. Following the slow build-up of the early caucuses and primaries, the US Presidential campaign moves up a gear on Super […]

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  • US election word of the week: primary

    Posted by on February 16, 2016

    In this new series we will be looking at some of the language and terminology associated with the US electoral process in the runup to the Presidential election in late 2016. This week’s word is primary. After the Iowa caucuses kicked off the long-drawn-out process for the election of the next President of the United […]

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  • US election word of the week: caucus

    Posted by on February 03, 2016

    In this new series we will be looking at some of the language and terminology associated with the US electoral process in the runup to the Presidential election in late 2016. First off, caucus. On Monday 1st February, registered Republican and Democrat voters gathered in schools, libraries and even private homes across the state of […]

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  • Language tip of the week: theatre

    Posted by on August 06, 2015

    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. These tips are usually based on areas of English which learners find difficult, e.g. spelling, grammar, collocation, synonyms, usage, etc. This week’s language tip helps with the differences in meaning of theatre in American and British English. In […]

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